Miles Lost Miles Gained

Art and science combine to virtually restore lost rivers through digital maps, sculpture and intersecting tales of ecosystem destruction and restoration.

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Mile Marker Rendering.
Mile Marker Rendering.

Source: ML/MG

Proposed Black River Mile Marker 1
Proposed Black River Mile Marker 1

Source: UW Archives

Supporters

MLMG is an artist-initiated project that cannot be realized without public and private support. This website is provided as a means to generate local and regional interest in the project, to facilitate partnerships with landowners along the corridors, who's participation is essential to virtually restoring the lost rivers of Puget Sound.

To learn more about partnership opportunities, including hosting a mile marker, and volunteering, contact us.

At this time Miles Lost/Miles Gained is not a registered non-profit, and donations , while greatly apreciated, are NOT tax deductible.

Testimonials for the artist and the MLMG project

"Art and engineering are fueled by creativity, and though distinct, the two fields often overlap. In the Pacific Northwest, art and engineering are strongly influenced by the natural surroundings. Majestic mountains and rainforests spawn clear, pristine rivers that flow to the sea supporting rich and diverse ecosystems of salmon, whales, shellfish, plants, and people. A century ago, Thomas Aldwell used engineering and frontier pragmatism to build dams on the Elwha River bringing economic prosperity to the Olympic Peninsula. But the river's ecology paid a price. The Elwha River is now being restored through removal of those dams, and a creative artist hopes to focus our attention on the health of other rivers. Zachary Corum's vision is to construct monuments at now-dry places where the Duwamish and Black Rivers once flowed. Symbolically, he hopes to use the discarded rubble of the two Elwha Dams as his medium. This is a fantastically original idea that helps us visualize the ubiquity of our rivers in a not-too-distant, uncontrolled past. The art will teach, and perhaps it will inspire a deeper appreciation for the natural flow of life-nourishing water from snow-capped peaks to biologically rich Puget Sound. We need this art, and we need this artist sowing his craft. "

Chris Magirl, hydrologist
Tacoma, Washington

"In today's engineered society, it is easy to lose touch with the natural world.  Many of us in King County are unaware that we live downstream of a dam, behind a levee or in an historic floodplain.  Zac Corum's ambitious project illustrates for us the connection between natural and engineered world;  helping us reclaim a bit of our natural history, develop a better sense of our environment today, and gives us hope for the future"  

Amy Reese, Hydraulic Engineer

Seattle, WA

Mile Marker Rendering.
Mile Marker Rendering.

Source: ML/MG

Proposed Black River Mile Marker 1
Proposed Black River Mile Marker 1

Source: UW Archives